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Key Words Year 1 and 2

 

We use the Letters and Sounds scheme to teach your children letter sounds, which helps them start to become readers.

 

Alongside this, the children learn to read and spell common words called ‘high frequency’ words. Children should be able to read them and spell them by the end of the school year. You can print them out to use as flashcards by clicking here, or better still make a game (see below for ideas).

 

This list for Year 1 and 2 includes more than 160 words. In addition, children should be able to read and write their own name and address, and their school's name and address. It does sound a lot, but it works out at 80 per year, or less than 30 per school term.

 

You can print them out to use as flashcards by clicking here, or better still make a game (see below for ideas).

 


 

High Frequency Words - Years 1 and 2

about

 

after

 

again

 

an

 

another

 

April

 

as

 

August

 

back

 

ball

 

be

 

because

 

bed

 

been

 

black

 

blue

 

boy

 

brother

 

brown

 

but

 

by

 

call

 

called

 

came

 

can't

 

could

 

December

 

did

 

dig

 

do

 

don't

 

door

 

down

 

eight

 

eighteen

 

eleven

 

February

 

fifteen

 

first

 

five

 

four

 

fourteen

 

Friday

 

from

 

girl

 

good

 

got

 

green

 

grey

 

had

 

half

 

has

 

have

 

help

 

her

 

here

 

him

 

his

 

home

 

house

 

how

 

if

 

January

 

July

 

jump

 

June

 

just

 

last

 

laugh

 

little

 

live

 

lived

 

love

 

made

 

make

 

man

 

many

 

March

 

may

 

May

 

Monday

 

more

 

much

 

must

 

name

 

new

 

next

 

night

 

nine

 

nineteen

 

not

 

November

 

now

 

October

 

off

 

old

 

once

 

one

 

one

 

or

 

orange

 

our

 

out

 

over

 

people

 

pull

 

purple

 

push

 

put

 

ran

 

red

 

Saturday

 

saw

 

school

 

seen

 

September

 

seven

 

seventeen

 

should

 

sister

 

six

 

sixteen

 

so

 

some

 

Sunday

 

take

 

ten

 

than

 

that

 

their

 

them

 

then

 

there

 

these

 

thirteen

 

three

 

three

 

Thursday

 

time

 

too

 

took

 

tree

 

Tuesday

 

twelve

 

twenty

 

two

 

two

 

us

 

very

 

want

 

water

 

way

 

Wednesday

 

were

 

what

 

when

 

where

 

white

 

who

 

will

 

with

 

would

 

yellow

 

your

 

 

Ideas for games to play with the flashcards

 

Print two copies of the words, using two different colours of paper, and cut out the word cards. The first thing you need to do is to limit the number of word cards you use at any one time. For a 4-5 year old, no more than 6 words will avoid overloading them (4 might be even better). Hide the rest away for another day.

 

Simple matching game

 

Not so much a game this one, as there is no winner, but many young children seem to enjoy straightforward matching activities without the need for any competitiveness! Spread out six cards of one colour (face up), reading each word out as you put it down. Then give your child the matching cards in the other colour. Read out the first word for them and ask them if they can find the matching word and place their card next to it. It can help to hold the card next to each word in turn to enable easy matching. You can encourage them and emphasise the word, e.g. "This word is 'and' - does that one say 'and'? No, let's try this one. Is it 'and'?" etc.

 

Pelmanism

 

Spread out your two sets of matching cards, face down. Take turns to pick up two cards, one of each colour. Read each word as you or your child turns it over. Check whether the words match - if they do, keep them and have another go. If they don't, put them back face down and let the other player have a turn. Soon, your child will begin to read the words without you.

 

Snap

 

Shuffle up the cards and share them out. Each player takes turns to turn over their card, put it down and read the word. If it matches the previous card played, the first person to notice shouts 'snap!' and wins the pile. This game is best used to practise words your child knows fairly well, rather than new ones, as it's quite fast-paced.

 

Once your child knows a word reliably, you can 'retire' it from your current pack of cards and bring in a new word. Every so often, play a game with the 'retired' cards, so that your child doesn't forget them. It's a good idea to try and discard an known word and add a new word every day, once your child is getting the hang of learning new words.